Winners of Sony World Photography Contest 2020

Winners of Sony World Photography Contest 2020

The Winners Of The Sony International Photography Competition 2020 Were Announced In Different Categories, Including Architecture, Creativity, Discovery, Documentary, Landscape, Natural World And Wildlife, Portrait, Still Life, Sports, And The New Category Of The Year, “Environment.”

The World Photography Organization has concluded the Sony World Photography Competition by announcing the overall professional, freelance, student, and youth winners for 2020. Six main winners were from European countries, and four others were from North America, South America, Asia, and Africa.

The annual Sony World Photography Award ceremony, held for 13 years, was held offline this year due to the spread of the Coronavirus. The winners of the Sony World Photography Award 2020 are subjects such as environmental problems in Latin America, Hong Kong protests, and the lives of refugees who have migrated to Europe.

Have registered. In the meantime, the name of Iranian photographer Hashem Shakri is also seen in second place in the “Discovery” category of this photography competition. Shakira won second place in this section of the Sony World Photography Awards by recording a series of photos titled “Rejected from Heaven” with the theme of Mehr housing projects around Tehran.

The winner of this competition’s photographer of the year award in 2020 is from the creative group and a brilliant collection of images that presents how deforestation simultaneously destroys communities and people.

In these powerful images, Pablo Albarenga shows the suffering of environmental activists struggling to save their communities from the destructive development of mining and agribusiness.

This collection of photos led to Pablo Albarenga being chosen as the photographer of the year at the 2020 Sony International Photography Awards.

Pablo is from Uruguay, and this project is very personal for him as a photographer. “The effort that went into anticipating, producing, and filming this series is commendable in every way,” says Mike True, president of the pro tournament.

 The title of the photographer of the year and a cash prize of 25,000 dollars were also awarded to Pablo Albarenga for his “Seeds of Resistance” photo collection. Below you can see a selected image of the winning photos in each category.

(Click on the images to view them in their original dimensions)

 Winner of the Photographer of the Year and Professional Photographer of Latin America awards

  • Photographer : Pablo Albarenga
  • Photo Title: seeds of resistance
  • Photo location: Uruguay

Nanto is a young indigenous man from the Achavar nation of Ecuador who leads a project to transport solar-powered riverboats for public transportation. By installing solar panels on the roof of unique boats, he is trying to end Achwar’s dependence on gasoline. In this photo, Nanto is in his homeland and the virgin rainforest of Achavar territory. He is lying down and wearing traditional Achwar clothes.

“Seeds of Resistance” is a series that depicts photographs of landscapes and areas at risk of mining and agribusiness alongside portraits of activists fighting to preserve them. In the photos, the main characters of the stories are seen from above, As if they are giving their lives for their soil. Pablo discovers the connection between the defenders and their lands. For its natives, this area is a sacred area where hundreds of generations of their ancestors have rested. See the entire series of this photo collection here.

Student Photographer of the Year Award Winner

  • Photographer: Yoana Saklaraki
  • Photo Title: Iforia
  • Photo location: Greece

In an era of climate change and land sustainability challenges, islands are particularly vulnerable. By their very nature, these landmasses are typically dependent on fossil fuels and energy imports (despite high transportation costs). Until a few years ago, it was almost impossible to imagine an island relying entirely on clean energy; However, this project is currently being realized in Tylos, Greece.

This small island in the Dodecanese archipelago is the first island in the Mediterranean to run almost entirely on renewable energy. Over the years, this island has received energy through an undersea cable from a diesel power plant on a neighboring island. Still, during the tourist season, this was unreliable and led to frequent power outages. However, since 2015, the island’s energy supply has been bolstered by a hybrid system powered exclusively by renewable sources, including solar and wind.

California is a Greek word for development based on using natural ecosystems and energy resources to ensure the future supply of resources. The photo above was taken in the island’s capital (Megalo Chorio), which has only 70 inhabitants in winter. At night on this island, the passageways, rooftops, and courtyards are illuminated by moonlight and provide many opportunities for photography. As it gets dark, there is a harmonious symbiosis between this technology and the arid and mountainous landscape of Tylos.s. Islanders use solar panels and various energy devices, including some homemade versions. The goal is to keep these jobs going as long as possible to help families through the winter.

Winner of the Young Photographer of the Year award

  • Photographer : Sin-Pang Sieh
  • Photo Title: Hurry up!
  • Photo location: Germany

The image in question shows a street performer who appears to be walking hurriedly but is standing still. Inspired by his own experience as a freshman in Germany, Hsien Pang sees this image as a nod to the hectic pace of life and a reminder for others to take a moment of calm and slow down.

In this picture, although this man seems to be in a hurry to get to work, he is standing, and this duality becomes a subject for the photographer. According to the photographer, this picture was taken shortly after he came to Germany to study. According to Pang, it was her first time traveling abroad alone, and she felt a lot of pressure to learn everything at school and try to catch up with the rest of the students. It is necessary to watch this picture on the days when life is moving at an immeasurable speed. “When I’m facing challenges, I look at this image, and it reminds me to take a moment and just breathe,” says Pang.

Winner of the architecture group award

  • Photographer: Sandra Herber
  • Photo Title: Ice fishing hut
  • Photo location: Canada

Winters in Manitoba, Canada, are long and often bitterly cold. As the temperature drops and thick ice forms, the lakes and rivers of the province host some unique folk architecture in the form of ice fishing huts. These huts needed to be portable to protect their occupants from the elements and allow access to fish hiding beneath frozen lakes and rivers. After meeting these requirements, the owners can express their taste in their cottages’ shape, structure, and decoration. They are big or small, ornate or plain, luxurious, practical, or anything.

Showing cabins in a minimalistic style with lighting like this allows the viewer to see the uniqueness and usefulness of mobile fishing cabins on frozen rivers in Canada and see these functional buildings as beautiful works of art. The photographer took this photo in December 2019 in Lake Winnipeg. See the entire series of this photo collection here.

Kashf group award winner

  • Photographer: Maria Kakonova
  • Photo Title: Mother
  • Photo location: Russia

The photographer of this photo says: “It’s been four years since I voluntarily isolated myself and lived in a country house in Leningrad Oblast. “I purposely limit social connections and media use so that my entire life is centered around my home, my children, and my artwork.”

However, contrary to all expectations, Maria’s life is calm and quiet. Maria’s isolation in the cave reminded her of emotionally unresolved childhood trauma. Also, a stress disorder caused by a series of four deaths and suicide in the family in a brief period during Maria’s retreat days became apparent. “In this project, I’m building my cave, combining photos I took at my parents’ house with images of where I live now,” says Maria. I pair these images with the experience of being physically present in the Sablinskiye Caves near my home. In a cave, your senses are limited, and it causes hallucinations. In similar circumstances, my memory creates illusions. My work explores the idea that being a mother and awakening primal instincts like unconditional love, aggression, and fear of death makes life so meaningful. Despite its challenges, living in a cave fosters creativity and becomes a personal legend. It also initiates a plan for the project and reflection processes.”

See the entire series of this photo collection here.

 The second-place winner of the Kashf group

  • Photographer: Hashem Akbari
  • Photo Title: Rejected from Paradise
  • Photo location: Tehran

The current US sanctions against Iran and the subsequent fall in the value of the Rial (Iran’s currency) have caused housing prices to skyrocket in this country. As a result, many Tehranis have been forced to leave the capital and move to satellite cities where it is cheaper to stay. The Mehr housing project, which began in 2007, was the largest government-funded housing project in the history of Iran.

What happened after that was the rapid growth of the urban population and the construction of new cities. However, the measures to ensure healthy living conditions for the residents of these new cities were not enough. Parand, Pardis, and Hashtgerd (three newly built towns on the outskirts of Tehran) suffered significant defects with the arrival of a large population.

These cities are vast islands of towering skyscrapers and over-developed apartments, crowded with people and cars. People from all over Iran are migrating to these new cities, which have become notorious for social evils such as high student suicide rates and drug use.

Parand residents talk about how the city’s population has doubled in the past six months to 200,000. However, this city can hardly provide educational, social, and health services for 10 thousand people. Newcomers in this city leave their homes early in the morning to go to their workplaces in the capital and usually commute for two to three hours a day.

The endless repetition of this cycle leads to alienation and disillusionment, and in addition, the level of unemployment is also increasing.

This piece of land seems to belong to those expelled from their paradise, the Tehran metropolis. And all of them share the bitterness of the fall with each other. The complete series of this photo collection from Parand residents talk about how the city’s population has doubled in the past six months to 200,000. However, this city can hardly provide educational, social, and health services for 10 thousand people.

Newcomers in this city leave their homes early in the morning to go to their workplaces in the capital and usually commute for two to three hours a day. The endless repetition of this cycle leads to alienation and disillusionment, and in addition, the level of unemployment is also increasing.

This piece of land seems to belong to those expelled from their paradise, the Tehran metropolis. And all of them share the bitterness of the fall with each other. The complete series of this photo collection from Parand residents talk about how the city’s population has doubled in the past six months to 200,000. However, this city can hardly provide educational, social, and health services for 10 thousand people. Newcomers in this city leave their homes early in the morning to go to their workplaces in the capital and usually commute for two to three hours a day. The endless repetition of this cycle leads to alienation and disillusionment, and in addition, the level of unemployment is also increasing.

This piece of land seems to belong to those expelled from their paradise, the Tehran metropolis. And all of them share the bitterness of the fall with each other.

The complete series of this photo collection is from Newcomers in this city who leave their homes early in the morning to go to their workplaces in the capital and usually commute for two to three hours a day.

The endless repetition of this cycle leads to alienation and disillusionment, and in addition, the level of unemployment is also increasing. This piece of land seems to belong to those expelled from their paradise, the Tehran metropolis. And all of them share the bitterness of the fall with each other.

The complete series of this photo collection is from Newcomers in this city who leave their homes early in the morning to go to their workplaces in the capital and usually commute for two to three hours a day.

The endless repetition of this cycle leads to alienation and disillusionment, and in addition, the level of unemployment is also increasing. This piece of land seems to belong to those expelled from their paradise, the Tehran metropolis. And all of them share the bitterness of the fall with each other. The complete series of this photo collection from see here

The winner of the documentary group award

  • Illustrator: Chang Man Ko
  • Photo Title: The wounds of Hong Kong
  • Photo location: China

Chu, a 17-year-old Hong Kong Secondary Education (DSE) student, was batoned by the police on September 7, 2019, while participating in a human chain at Tai Po Station in Hong Kong. He was covered in blood, and his head was so severely hit that he needed many stitches. Also, the little finger of his right hand was broken, and he required six bone screws. He has decided to put his degree on hold for a year to deal with PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder).

Protests in Hong Kong show no signs of abating after months of unrest, and what began as a protest against the extradition bill has turned into a broader protest over the city’s future. Reports indicate that since the demonstrations, cases of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have increased among the country’s population. Milan Kundera, a famous writer from the Czech Republic, says: “The struggle of men against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting. In any case, scars and bruises will fade, but we must remember what factors caused them.”

See the entire series of this photo collection here.

The winner of the environmental group award

  • Photographer : Robin Hinsch
  • Photo Title: Niger Delta
  • Photo location: Nigeria

This image was recorded by a German photographer named Robin Hinsch from the Niger Delta. The idea that the environmental destruction as a result of the development of oil fields and the burning of surplus gas in the Niger Delta gives. Covering 70,000 square kilometers of wetlands, the Niger Delta was formed primarily by sedimentation. This region is home to more than 30 million people and 40 different ethnic groups, which make up 7.5% of the total land area of ​​Nigeria. Before the arrival of the oil industry, the system boasted a vibrant ecosystem containing one of the highest concentrations of biodiversity on Earth.

The Nigerian Petroleum Resources Authority estimated that 1.89 million barrels were spilled into the Niger Delta between 1976 and 1996. In addition, the United Nations report indicates a total of 6,817 spills between 1976 and 2001 in this delta, About three million barrels of oil!

So far, authorities and oil companies have done little to clean up and neutralize the delta, and oil spills are still widespread. Half of the falls are caused by pipeline and tanker accidents, while the others are caused by vandalism (28%), oil production operations (21%), and inadequate production equipment (1%). Another issue in the Niger Delta is gas flaring, a by-product of oil extraction.

Burning this gas has consequences such as loss of crops, water pollution, and a negative impact on human health. The 2019 Wahalla shootings in Nigeria drew attention to the lackluster economic growth and its adverse effects on the Nigerian environment. See the entire series of this photo collection here.

The winner of the Manzarek group award

  • Photographer: Rani Bannert
  • Photo Title: Inotsaragi Gate
  • Photo location: Japan

According to the photographer’s description of this photo, Ino Tsaragi Gate was one of the wholly hidden things, and it wasn’t easy to find that fantastic spot. Still, after a few hours of searching and exploring, it was found. A tori is a traditional Japanese gate usually located at the entrance or inside a (Shinto) shrine. The unique feature of this gate was the symmetrical arrangement of two foreground lamps. Roni Bennert, the German photographer of this photo, spent three hours photographing this gate because of the spiritual atmosphere prevailing in that place.

Evidence of Shintoism and Buddhism, the most common religions in Japan, can be found in every corner of the country. Traditional Japanese shrines and gates are usually found at the entrance of Shinto shrines and mark the transition from mundane spaces to sacred spaces.

According to Ronnie Bannert, exposure to light sometimes takes 5 minutes or more to eliminate any distracting elements in the water or sky; Because the more extended the disclosure, the more precise the photo will be. Ronnie Bannert has used neutral density filters to allow for long exposures and to keep his photography style minimal. See the entire series of this photo collection here.

Winner of the natural world and wildlife group award

  • Photographer: Yerent Shirton
  • Photo Title: Pangolins in crisis
  • Photo location: South Africa

A pangolin is relearning how to eat after being rescued from poachers on the Zimbabwe border in South Africa. Pangolin keepers at this obscure farm care for saved and illegally trafficked pangolins and help them find ants and termites to eat. Caregivers also protect pangolins from legal and illegal poachers.

There are only three pangolin rescue and rehabilitation sites in the world. They are very fragile animals, and most die quickly in captivity. Pangolins are more illegally trafficked than any mammal in the world, and in the last ten years, about one million pangolins have been smuggled into Asia.

Their skin is used in traditional Chinese and Vietnamese medicine, and their meat is sold as delicious food at a high price. As a result, pangolins are in grave danger of extinction, and all their trade and use are illegal. While uncovering the illicit aspects and celebrating the people who try to save these animals, this photo collection also exposes the work of pangolins.

The Tiki Haywood Trust conducts pangolin awareness, trains law enforcement and judicial personnel, conducts research, and rehabilitates pangolins rescued from the illegal trade. This group is based in Zimbabwe, But they also work with partners across Africa and Asia. See the entire series of this photo collection here.

The winner of the portrait group award

  • Photographer: Cesar Dezfuli
  • Photo Title: Malik Gambia
  • Photo location: Mediterranean/Italy

The image on the left shows Malik Gambia on a rescue ship in the Mediterranean on August 1, 2016. The picture on the right was taken on June 26, 2019, in Italy, where Malik Gambia currently lives.

On August 1, 2016, 118 people were rescued from a rubber dinghy in the Mediterranean Sea. The boat had left Libya a few hours earlier. Caesar Dezfuli (the photographer of these pictures) took pictures of the passengers minutes after they were rescued, trying to give a human face to this event. Faces, looks, signs on the body, etc., all show the mood and physical condition after the journey that had determined the new path of their lives forever.

According to Cesar Desfoley, this was the beginning of a project that has been progressing ever since. It soon became clear that the people photographed by Caesar on that August day were not themselves. Their true identity was hidden along the way due to fear, Or because of past abuses and humiliations, he went to Yama.

For the past three years, Dezfuli has been trying to find and document the 118 passengers of that boat, now scattered across Europe, and to understand and confirm their true identities. “I wanted to show that every person has a hidden identity that just needs a peaceful background and a good environment to flourish again,” he says.

See the entire series of this photo collection here.

 Sports group award winner

  • Photographer: Angel Lopez Soto
  • Photo Title: Senegalese wrestlers
  • Photo location: Senegal

Wrestling has become the national sport in Senegal and parts of The Gambia. This activity belongs to a more extensive form of traditional West African wrestling and is more popular than football. Senegalese wrestlers practice two forms of this sport: Lutte Traditionnelle Avec frappe and Lutte Traditionnelle sans frappe (international version).

These wrestling matches are better known because of the attraction of an audience of about 50,000 people in a stadium. The sport has also become a means of social ascent in Senegal, making some athletes millionaires. This sport is a slice of African life, tradition, and culture for many people mixed with animism and Muslim beliefs. This picture also shows the training of wrestlers on the beach of Dakar. See the entire series of this photo collection here.

The winner of the still life group award

  • Photographer: Alessandro Gandolfi
  • Photo Title: Immortality
  • Photo location: Japan

This image was captured at the Miraikan Museum (Japan’s National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation). It showed a close-up of a robot called Alter on display at the museum. Alter is a robot that wants to be among humanity’s first steps to achieving immortality by uploading the content of the mind in chips and the form of robots. The Alter robot, which works without needing external stimuli and guidance, can detect the sounds and movements of its environment using its intelligent sensors and respond to them. Like the Alter, it loaded and thus could survive forever by overcoming the physical limitations imposed by the human body.

In the 21st century, Yuval Neve Harari, an Israeli writer, historian, and professor of history at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, wrote in his book Homodeus: “As a brief history of tomorrow, humans probably make a serious bid for immortality. Few scientists and intellectuals are growing in this field, and the most critical challenge facing modern science is overcoming death and achieving the promise of immortality. Can a man become immortal?

Few people believe this, so research has focused on protecting the cooling system, human-machine hybridization, and mind uploading rather than studying immortality.

However, most scientists agree that the average human lifespan will increase to 129 years in the future, and our health will improve significantly. Currently, longevity research has become a billion-dollar business, mainly due to significant advances in bioengineering, nanomedicine, genetics, and artificial intelligence.