Learn vector in R in simple language-Vectors are the most basic data objects in R

Vectors are the most basic data objects in R, and there are six types of vectors: logical, integer, double, complex, character, and raw.

Create vector in R

Single member vectors

Even when you only write one value in R; It is actually a vector that has a length of 1 and belongs to one of the above types of vectors:

# Atomic vector of type character.

print (“abc”);

# Atomic vector of type double.

print (12.5)

# Atomic vector of type integer.

print (63L)

# Atomic vector of type logical.

print (TRUE)

# Atomic vector of type complex.

print (2 + 3i)

# Atomic vector of type raw.

print (charToRaw (‘hello’))

When we run the above code; The following result is obtained:

[1] “abc”

[1] 12.5

[1] 63

[1] TRUE

[1] 2 + 3i

[1] 68 65 6c 6c 6f

Multi-member vector in R

Using a two-point operator with numeric data; Are created:

# Creating a sequence from 5 to 13.

v <- 5:13

print (v)

# Creating a sequence from 6.6 to 12.6.

v <- 6.6: 12.6

print (v)

# If the final element specified does not belong to the sequence then it is discarded.

v <- 3.8: 11.4

print (v)

When we run the above code; The following results are obtained:

[1] 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

[1] 6.6 7.6 8.6 9.6 10.6 11.6 12.6

[1] 3.8 4.8 5.8 6.8 7.8 8.8 9.8 10.8

Using the (.Seq) operator

# Create vector with elements from 5 to 9 incrementing by 0.4.

print (seq (5, 9, by = 0.4))

When we run the above code; The following results are obtained:

[1] 5.0 5.4 5.8 6.2 2.6.6 7.0 7.4 7.8 8.2 8.6 9.0

Using the () function c)

If one of the elements is a character; Non-character values ​​are assigned to some type of character.

# The logical and numeric values ​​are converted to characters.

s <- c (‘apple’, ‘red’, 5, TRUE)

print (s)

When we run the above code; The following result is obtained:

[1] “apple” “red” “5” “TRUE”

Access to vector in R elements

Vector elements are made available using indexing. Brackets [] are used for indexing and indexing. Indexing starts with position 1. Giving a negative value to this index will cause this element to be removed from the result. TREU, FASE or 0 and 1 can also be used for indexing.

# Accessing vector elements using position.

t <- c (“Sun”, “Mon”, “Tue”, “Wed”, “Thurs”, “Fri”, “Sat”)

u <- t [c (2,3,6)]

print (u)

# Accessing vector elements using logical indexing.

v <- t (c (TRUE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE)]

print (v)

# Accessing vector elements using negative indexing.

x <- t [c (-2, -5)]

print (x)

# Accessing vector elements using 0/1 indexing.

y <- t [c (0,0,0,0,0,0,1)]

print (y)

When we run the above code; The following result is obtained:

Using a vector

Two vectors of the same length can be added together and subtracted; Multiply or divide and create the result as a vector at the output.

# Create two vectors.

v1 <- c (3,8,4,5,0,11)

v2 <- c (4,11,0,8,1,2)

# Vector addition.

add.result <- v1 + v2

print (add.result)

# Vector subtraction.

sub.result <- v1-v2

print (sub.result)

# Vector multiplication.

multi.result <- v1 * v2

print (multi.result)

# Vector division.

divi.result <- v1 / v2

print (divi.result)

When we run the above code; The following results are generated:

[1] 7 19 4 13 1 13

[1] -1 -3 4 -3 -1 9

[1] 12 88 0 40 0 ​​22

[1] 0.7500000 0.7272727 Inf 0.6250000 0.0000000 5.5000000

Recycling vector elements

If we perform arithmetic operations on two vectors of unequal length; Then shorter vector elements to complete the operation; Are recycled.

v1 <- c (3,8,4,5,0,11)

v2 <- c (4.11)

# V2 becomes c (4,11,4,11,4,11)

add.result <- v1 + v2

print (add.result)

sub.result <- v1-v2

print (sub.result)

When we run the above code; The following results are generated:

[1] 7 19 8 16 4 22

[1] -1 -3 0 -6 -4 0

Sort the members of a vector

The members within a vector can be sorted using the sort () function.

v <- c (3,8,4,5,0,11, -9, 304)

# Sort the elements of the vector.

sort.result <- sort (v)

print (sort.result)

# Sort the elements in the reverse order.

revsort.result <- sort (v, decreasing = TRUE)

print (revsort.result)

# Sorting character vectors.

v <- c (“Red”, “Blue”, “yellow”, “violet”)

sort.result <- sort (v)

print (sort.result)

# Sorting character vectors in reverse order.

revsort.result <- sort (v, decreasing = TRUE)

print (revsort.result)

When we run the above code; The following result is obtain:

[1] -9 0 3 4 5 8 11 304

[1] 304 11 8 5 4 3 0 -9

[1] “Blue” “Red” “violet” “yellow”

[1] “yellow” “violet” “Red” “Blue”

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