Does Eating A Big Breakfast Help You Lose Weight?

Does Eating A Big Breakfast Help You Lose Weight?

According To Popular Belief, Eating A Big Meal At The Beginning Of The Day Can Help Lose Weight, But The Researchers Proved That This Idea Is Not True.

According to some of the most popular diet recommendations of recent years, correctly timing your meals can dramatically affect weight loss. And according to a long-standing belief, if you want to lose weight, it is better to eat a larger meal at the beginning of the day and smaller meals later.

The logic of this theory is understandable, Especially since almost all cells in the body are subject to the same 24-hour cycle. The body’s circadian clocks regulate the daily rhythm of most biological functions, especially metabolism.

Based on metabolic rhythms, scientists concluded that the method of processing meals is different at different times of the day. This field of research is called chrono-nutrition and has a lot of potentials to help people’s health.

According to two 2013 studies, consuming more calories at the beginning of the day and fewer calories in the afternoon helps to lose weight. However, according to a new study, although the relative size of breakfast and dinner affects self-reported appetite, it does not affect metabolism and weight loss.

A group of researchers from the universities of Aberdeen and Surrey conducted a controlled study on healthy and overweight people to investigate the relationship between the size of breakfast and dinner and their effect on hunger.

Participants were given two types of diets each for four weeks: one with a large breakfast and a small dinner and the other with a small breakfast and a large dinner.

The lunch of both diets was the same.

The researchers were also aware of the number of calories consumed by each participant. They measured the participants’ metabolism. Specifically, the number of calories burned.

All participants of this study complied with both conditions of the diet; As a result, the effect of dietary patterns was comparable among individuals. According to predictions, a big breakfast and a small dinner lead to weight loss by increasing calorie burning.

Still, the experiment results showed no difference in body weight or even biological measures of energy consumption between the two food patterns.

English breakfast

It is up to you to decide on the timing of the most significant meal.

Measures of energy expenditure included basal metabolic rate (the number of calories the body burns at rest), physical activity, and consumption of a chemical form of water, which allows the assessment of daily energy expenditure.

The results showed no difference in the daily level of blood sugar, insulin, or lipids. This result is significant from the view that the changes in these factors in the blood have a direct relationship with the health of the body’s metabolism.

The research findings align with the studies of food timing (one to six days). In these studies, participants live in laboratory breathing chambers (a small, airtight room equipped with basic facilities) for the duration of the experiment.

Research shows that how the body absorbs and digests calories in the morning or the afternoon does not affect weight loss. This result is precisely opposite to previous studies.

The difference in the new research was the change in the self-reported sense of hunger and related measures such as the amount of food. The eating pattern of a big breakfast and a small dinner during the day made the participants feel less hungry. This program may be helpful for people who are looking for weight loss; Because it helps them control their hunger better and consume less food.

This research, like other research, has limitations. For example, the study only monitored participants for four weeks for each dietary pattern. Past research after four weeks showed significant differences between energy absorption at first and at the end of the day.

However, the fact that calories consumed and burned did not change over the four weeks suggests that body weight is unlikely to change even if the follow-up period is extended.

Study participants were allowed to choose the exact time of each meal.

However, there was little difference in the timing of each food pattern. Chrono-nutrition is an exciting area of ​​research, and there is a lot of evidence on the importance of meal timing in improving people’s health. However, the latest research shows that timing the most substantial meal does not affect weight loss.

It is up to you to decide on the timing of the most significant meal.

Measures of energy expenditure included basal metabolic rate (the number of calories the body burns at rest), physical activity, and consumption of a chemical form of water, which allows assessment of daily energy expenditure.

The results showed no difference in the daily level of blood sugar, insulin, or lipids. This result is significant from the view that the changes in these factors in the blood have a direct relationship with the health of the body’s metabolism.

The research findings align with the studies of food timing (one to six days). In these studies, participants live in laboratory breathing chambers (a small, airtight room equipped with basic facilities) for the duration of the experiment.

Research shows that how the body absorbs and digests calories in the morning or the afternoon does not affect weight loss. This result is precisely opposite to previous studies.

The difference in the new research was the change in the self-reported sense of hunger and related measures such as the amount of food.

The eating pattern of a big breakfast and a small dinner during the day made the participants feel less hungry. This program may be helpful for people who are looking for weight loss; Because it helps them control their hunger better and consume less food.

This research, like other research, has limitations. For example, the study only monitored participants for four weeks for each dietary pattern. Past research after four weeks showed significant differences between energy absorption at first and at the end of the day.

However, the fact that calories consumed and burned did not change over the four weeks suggests that body weight is unlikely to change even if the follow-up period is extended.

Study participants were allowed to choose the exact time of each meal.

However, there was little difference in the timing of each food pattern. Chrono-nutrition is an exciting area of ​​research, and there is a lot of evidence on the importance of meal timing in improving people’s health. However, the latest research shows that timing the most substantial meal does not affect weight loss.